Cultural & Historic Attractions

McClellanville Museum 4-17-14-136-280Awendaw and McClellanville have an extremely rich cultural history
dating back to the 1600s. Not only are there multiple attractions you can explore on your own, there are also many guide services who would be happy to tell you all about the secluded gem that makes up the Bulls Bay Historic Passage.
Click on the title to see more information and pictures for each listing.
Photo from the Village Museum graciously provided by Ben Sumrell Photography

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Bethel AME Church
Organized in 1867, Bethel AME (African American Episcopal) is the oldest of its kind in the McClellanville area. Come see a piece of history today.
369 Drayton Street, McClellanville, SC
Hampton Plantation
The colonial-era rice plantation is now open to the public as a State Historic Site that showcases the plantation's Georgian-style mansion and well-kept grounds. Here you can participate in mansion tours, fish in Hampton Creek, bird-watch, or hike the two-mile interpretive trail that circles an abandoned rice field. Guided birding and nature hikes, as well as kayak and canoe tours, are offered here by Nature Adventures Outfitters.
843-546-9361
1950 Rutledge Road, McClellanville, SC
Hopsewee Plantation
This South Carolina's National Historic Landmark has been standing since before the Revolutionary War, yet has only been owned by 5 families. Come see this beautifully preserved piece of history. Dining at the tearoom on site is available Tuesday through Saturday from 10:30am until 3:30pm.
843-546-7891
494 Hopsewee Rd, Georgetown, SC 29440
Lighthouse Island
As part of the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, the island is accessible only by boat. It has two lighthouses: a small red brick constructed in 1857 at 65 feet tall, and a 150-foot tower, equipped with a Fresnel lens in 1857. Confederate forces removed the lens and damaged the tower during the Civil War so that Northern forces would not benefit from its signal. Captain Sunshine and Coastal Expeditions offer tours to the lighthouse area, or feel free to explore on your own!
New Wappetaw Presbyterian Church
The New Wappetaw Presbyterian Church is a small but lively historic church located. In addition to our Sunday worship service, we offer a nursery and Sunday school for adults and youth. We have active adult and children’s choirs, men’s and women’s groups, luncheons, and other activities including outreach. Visitors are welcome, please join us!
(843) 887-3953
635 Pinckney Street, McClellanville, SC
Sewee Indian Ruins
Though the landscape of this particular site has suffered damage from hurricanes and wildfires, this one-mile trail still offers a unique opportunity for hiking and exploration. The trail guides you to the Sewee Shell Ring, which is an ancient pile of discarded shells from Native Americans dating back over 4,000 years ago. It is now on the National Register of Historic Places and is one of the best preserved of similar shell rings found along the East Coast. Another spur trail leads to a mound of clamshells, and there are five interpretive stops and a 120-foot boardwalk and overlook.
St. James Santee Episcopal Church
We are one Church with two church buildings: The Chapel of Ease (1890) in McClellanville and The Brick Church at Wambaw (1768) near Hampton Plantation.
We hold a lively variety of political and theological positions, respect each other, like to laugh, and are not stuffy. Some important things that bind us together are our love for Jesus Christ and his Church, the new life that is ours in Him, a genuine affection for each other, and a strong desire to respond to those in need.
The Brick Church at Wambaw was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1972. Today, it is highly valued for its architectural and historical significance.
144 Oak Street, McClellanville, SC
Village Museum
Far and wide, the Village Museum has been recognized as one of SC’s finest small town museums. Displays bring to life a time line that begins with See Wee Indian villages, explores a mid-1600s French Huguenot settlement at nearby Jamestown, reveals the trial and tribulations of rice planting on Santee River waterways, and then moves to the establishment of McClellanville as a thriving coastal resort. Other exhibits reveal the modest lifestyle of postwar farmers, the twentieth century upsurge of timber harvesting and the solid, steady growth of the local seafood industry.
843-887-3030
401 Pinckney Street, McClellanville SC 29458
Wambaw Church
Old Georgetown Highway, McClellanville, SC

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Photo courtesy of Arthur Ellis Photography